Tag: Vascular Surgeon

Peripheral Artery Disease

 

Artery

  •  An artery is a blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to other parts of the body.
  • Arteries are thicker than veins and have more robust, more elastic walls.
  • Arteries sometimes develop plaque within their walls in a process known as atherosclerosis.
  • These plaques can become fragile and rupture, leading to complications associated with diabetes, such as heart attacks and strokes.

Peripheral arteries

  • Peripheral arteries send oxygen-rich blood to all parts of the body.
  • In PAD, plaque builds up in the artery walls.
  • Just like coronary artery disease, plaque narrows the arteries and leaves less room for blood to flow through. 
  • If your legs do not get enough oxygen and nutrients, they will feel sore or tired when you walk or climb stairs.
  • Having PAD raises your chances of a heart attack or stroke.
  • With PAD, not enough oxygen-rich blood and energy can pass through the arteries due to narrowing. 


The following symptoms may indicate the disease:

weakness in legs; numbness or cramping in legs with walking; legs may feel cold; color change, dark pink, purplish, dusky.

The symptoms may be present or absent but are due to a lack of blood flow to the muscle group, resulting in pain in the affected muscle groups. However, if the individual has diabetes or neuropathy, they may not feel the pain.

The presence of an extremity ulcer is one of the more obvious clinical signs of poor circulation. Other common symptoms: pain with walking a short distance; pain at rest when legs are elevated, but lessens when legs are dangled over the side of the bed or sofa.

Additional warning signs:

  • If you have poor circulation, it will typically begin in your legs first
  • Pain in the calf muscles when you walk (claudication) is the most common symptom
  • Poor wound healing or decline in the pulses in your feet
  • These symptoms may indicate severe blockages in the vascular system
     

Peripheral Vascular Disease

 

Introducing Dr. David J. Paolini

Dr. David J. Paolini Vascular Surgeon with Western Vascular Institute. Board Certified Vascular Surgeon

Dr. David Paolini is a Vascular Surgeon with over 15 years of Vascular Surgery experience.  Dr. Paolini recently joined Western Vascular Institute as one of our acclaimed vascular surgeons from the Jobst vascular center in Toledo, Ohio. Dr. Paolini has had a passion for medicine and physics from a young age, feeling that Vascular Surgery is the perfect combination of the two scientific areas. Dr. Paolini completed his medical school training from Temple University (One of the best Medical Schools in the united states) in 1999 and after that moved to New Mexico to begin his residency at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Department of Surgery. After completing a 5-year surgical residency Dr. Paolini then moved to Toledo, Ohio to complete a Vascular Surgery specific fellowship at the prestigious Jobst Vascular Center. Dr. Paolini quickly gained accolades as one of the most innovative and competent vascular surgeons in the area as well as being heavily invested in Vascular Surgery research and publications. Dr. Paolini’s care philosophy is “ to take care of patients like you would want your kids’ taken care of ”. As a father of two wonderful children and supported by his beautiful wife Dr. Paolini is poised to join the ranks of the great caring vascular surgeons here at Western Vascular Institute. Dr. Paolini’s previous patients have described dr. Paolini as being kind, compassionate, & honest. We are excited to have Dr. Paolini as part Western Vascular Institute. Dr. Paolini is now accepting new patients in the Mesa and Payson office locations. For an appointment with Dr. Paolini please contact one of our new patient coordinators at (480) 668-5000 ext. 332

 

TransCarotid Artery Revascularization

A small incision is made just above the collar bone to expose the common carotid artery. A soft, flexible sheath is placed directly into the carotid artery and connected to a system that will reverse the flow of blood away from the brain to protect against fragments of plaque that may come loose during the procedure. The blood is filtered and returned through a second sheath placed in the femoral vein in the patient’s thigh. The Neuroprotection system allows balloon angioplasty and stenting to be performed while blood flow is reversed. After the stent is placed successfully to stabilize the plaque in the carotid artery, flow reversal is turned off and blood flow to the brain resumes in its normal direction.

Silk Road’s TCAR Procedure is designed to protect the brain from most sizes and types of embolic debris when introducing interventional devices into the carotid artery. Small emboli, not large enough to cause a major stroke, can still cause a minor brain infarction and impact cognitive function.1-3 A sensitive imaging technology called Diffusion Weighted -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) can be used to detect these small brain infarctions.

TCAR is a surgically inspired procedure and is designed to mimic the arterial access and safeguards of surgery. In carotid artery surgery, the arteries are clamped above and below the blockage to block blood flow and prevent plaque from traveling to the brain during treatment. Similarly, the ENROUTE® Transcarotid Neuroprotection System isolates the blockage from forward blood flow during stent placement by actually reversing blood flow away from the brain. Because the flow reversal method does not rely on a distally placed filter to capture emboli before they reach the brain, it collects both small and large debris.

 

What does a Vascular Surgeon do? An Informative Look into Vascular Care

A Vascular Surgeon is a highly trained specialist that focuses on diseases of the vascular system.

Vascular Surgeons treat blood vessels & arteries that are responsible for carrying oxygen rich blood throughout your body and returning it to your heart.

“Vascular surgeons treat every artery & vein of the body except the brain & heart” (1).

More than just surgery, a Vascular Surgeon educates patients on their disease process and helps provide every treatment option available.

Vascular surgeons are trained to know when to perform vascular surgery, but more importantly when not to perform surgery.
1 (Society for Vascular Surgery)
(https://vascular.org)

Vascular surgeons are trained in complicated open, as well as minimally invasive endovascular procedures.

Because they are able to provide all treatment options they are not biased to perform the one or two procedures within their scope.

 

Western Vascular Welcomes Dr. Dawn Olsen

Western Vascular Institute is proud to welcome Dr. Dawn Olsen D.O to WVI’s esteemed group of Vascular surgeons.

Dr. Olsen is a skilled Vascular Surgeon who has devoted herself to caring for those with vascular disease. Initially, Dr. Olsen became a vascular Physician Assistant (PA) at the Arizona Heart Institute under the tutelage of world-recognized surgeon, Dr. Edward B. Diethrich. After years of unparalleled service as a vascular PA Dr. Olsen further realized her dedicated passion for vascular medicine, and in 2008 returned to school to gain her medical degree of osteopathic medicine at the University at Buffalo.

Dr. Olsen is residency-trained in peripheral and endovascular surgery, and also certificated in both wound care and non-invasive vascular ultrasound. Dr. Olsen has co-authored nearly 30 peer reviewed publications including book chapters, and has presented at meetings across the United States and abroad. Having more than 14 years of diverse experience, she has returned to the Arizona and is excited to help improve the lives of those suffering from venous and vascular diseases and conditions.

Dr. Olsen is seeing patients at all three Western Vascular Institute locations

Including:

  • Phoenix
  • Mesa
  • Payson

Call to schedule an appointment with Dr. Olsen at (480) 668-5000

Request an Appointment

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